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Brexit Deadline Nears With No Conclusive Settlement Between EU and Britain

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Boris Johnson had announced earlier that Britain would make an exit by October 31, with or without a deal.

As the deadline to Brexit comes closer, the European Union and British negotiators have not reached a conclusive agreement on how Britain can exit the bloc without hurting the interest of the rest of the European Union.

Boris Johnson had announced earlier that Britain would make an exit by October 31, with or without a deal. This will be his most crucial week of leadership to see if he can make everyone happy.  

It seems that the agreement put across has not satisfied the EU government and Britain’s parliament, who have been divided on Britain’s exit.

While talks are intensifying on the sidelines of the summit in Brussels, what is coming to light is that there is a difference of opinion over two major aspects in the agreement.

The U.K.’s proposals are not able to address a sticky point of how to avoid a physical border on the island of Ireland.  Boris Johnson’s recent visits to Ireland could not do the same either and was termed as the simple maneuver to win him brownie points ahead of elections.

Once a reasonable deal comes through, Britain is suppose to enter a period of 14 months where relations with the European Union will be maintained while a new trade deal is negotiated. Political analysts feel this could take almost a year. 

However, in case no deal comes through between EU and Britain by October 19, a law will be passed by the British Parliament forcing the government to request an extension to the negotiations.

There is a tussle for an extension from all sides. On one side is the British Parliament, which would sit on October 19, if no deal comes through, looking for ways to push for an extension. A confidence vote for the government is likely to come through once Boris Johnson returns from the summit and participates in the vote for the legislative agenda. He is likely to lose. This would lead to elections in November.

On the other side, Scotland is already preparing for the British government to put in a request for an extension with Brussels. If that does not happen, Scotland’s top court is due to hear a case by pro-EU campaigners who say the court itself should request an extension if Mr Johnson hasn’t.

But Boris Johnson is not going to move for an extension, saying that he has given five different offers to the EU for exits to come through smoothly. Like Theresa May, Johnson’s success also hangs loosely on his stance on the Brexit issue. So while the parliament refuses to cooperate with him, a strong vote bank might make him sail through the governance period. One will have to wait and watch while the opposition might get together and float the idea of a Brexit referendum and give a carrot to hang onto to the British populace instead.

Read more articles about PM Boris Johnson: https://www.theforeigncode.com/category/europe/

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