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Exit Poll Shows Strong Win Again For Polish Law And Justice Party

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Poland’s nationalist ruling party Jaroslaw Kaczynski looks strong, according to the exit poll results

Poland’s nationalist ruling party looks strong to extend its governance for the next four years, the exit poll results show.

Showing the highest turnaround since 1989, the party has secured 44 percent of the votes. Political analysts now feel that the governing party might be left with no option but form a strong coalition with a far-right Confederation Party. At the moment, it is looking all set to continue with governance.

 But with the way the exit polls are showing, the nationalist party might be all set to hold the seat of governance for the next four years.

The Law and Justice Party has had to its credit campaigning on significant topics. It has to its credit talking about cultural issues that have polarized Polish society, promising to halt the spread of gay rights and defend the local Catholic church from the incursion of secular values.

 To its credit, the party had introduced generous welfare programmes that have improved the lives of poorer Polish citizens who feel they were left behind during a rapid, but sometimes chaotic, 30-year transition from a failing communist, planned economy to a fast-growing free-market democracy.

Many polish people now agree that their quality of life has improved and they are hopeful of a better change in the hands of the current governance, which is why more than 44 percent have chosen to vote for the Nationalist Party. But what is interesting to note is that Jaroslaw Kaczynski’s party seems to resonate the ideology of conservative Poland situated on the countryside, and does not look at the emerging Polish majority in the cities, which have turned a dislike to the party’s approach towards the LGBT rights. The Law and Justice Party is also known to be tightly noosed over professions like law and media and this has had a rift of its own since their governance went into action in 2015. Currently, the exit polls have counted results over 75percent voting. Future trend might see a divide between the have and have-nots.

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